Persimmon pulp not only makes a delicious puree but is also the perfect ingredient to add flavor to your favorite fall recipes. Learn how to make persimmon pulp today!

Homemade persimmon pulp in a small bowl and being stored in glass mason jars in the background.

I have made a number of different persimmon recipes over the years. And aside from my baked persimmons, every recipe has called for persimmon puree.

Now, the kicker is, if you have seeds in your persimmons, as I and so many others do, how in the world do I go about getting those little buggers out so I can make my puree?

Well, the solution is actually quite simple. We are going to press the persimmon pulp out by hand, and it’s only going to take a couple of minutes.

Scooping a heap of persimmon pulp puree out of a bowl.

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How to make persimmon pulp

To make your pulp, you will need a strainer or a colander to press out the pulp. A strainer will make a purer puree, though either will work.

You can also puree as many persimmons as you’d like, but to give you an idea of how much product you will get, figure 70 persimmons will give you about a cup and a half of persimmon pulp.

Persimmon pulp recipe:

  1. Start by preparing the persimmons for processing. Remove the stems from each fruit and discard them.
  2. Rinse the persimmons in cool water to remove any dirt or debris.
  3. Once thoroughly rinsed, place the persimmons in a colander and strain any excess water.
  4. Set up a metal strainer or colander over a large bowl to capture the pulp.
  5. Working in batches of 10-15 persimmons at a time, use a large spoon to smash the pulp through the strainer or colander.
  6. Continue smashing the persimmons until you have extracted all of the pulp. Scoop out the peel and seeds from the strainer and continue with the rest of the fruit.
  7. Once you’ve extracted all of the pulp, transfer it to an airtight container for storage.

Tips for making persimmon pulp

This method is perfect for persimmons with seeds in them, as the seeds are very difficult to remove.

A mesh strainer works best and produces perfect persimmon pulp. A colander will work as well. However, there may be a few larger pieces of pulp that make it through.

If your persimmons do not have seeds, you can puree the persimmon pulp in a blender.

A decorated display with fresh persimmons, persimmon puree and a towel on a wooden cutting board.

How do I tell when persimmons are ripe?

There are several signs for when persimmons are ripe and ready to pick.

Perhaps the first thing you’ll notice is the color change. Persimmons will turn from a yellow hue to a reddish-orange shade when they are ripe.

They’ll also pluck easily from the tree. If you have to pull with any force to retrieve the fruit from the tree, it’s likely not ready yet.

The fruit will also become soft, almost like a very ripe peach.

If your persimmons are not ripe, leave them on the counter for a few days until they soften up.

An example of ripe and not ripe persimmons.
Left: persimmons that have ripened. Right: persimmons not quite ripe.

Why you will love this persimmon pulp recipe

Simple to make: Making persimmon pulp is a straightforward process that can be done in just a few simple steps. Plus, you get to enjoy the satisfaction of creating something delicious from scratch.

This costs nothing to make: If you have persimmon trees in your backyard, this is the perfect way to take advantage of these delightful little treats.

Perfect addition to any recipe: Persimmon pulp can be added to any recipe, calling for a fruit puree. I love it in oatmeal slathered on french toast or substituted for applesauce or pumpkin puree.

What is persimmon pulp?

Persimmon pulp is the smooth, sweet, and thick puree made from ripe persimmons. Think of it just like apple puree, its essentially the applesauce of persimmons.

Homemade persimmon pulp being stirred with a gold spoon.

Frequently asked questions

Do you peel persimmons?
There is no need to peel persimmons before making pulp. Using the mesh screen in this recipe will, for the most part, keep most of the peel out of the pulp. However, the peel is edible and should not negatively affect the taste.

How to freeze persimmon pulp?
To freeze persimmon pulp, transfer it to an airtight container or freezer bag. Label the container with the date and freeze for up to 6 months.

When are persimmons ripe?
Persimmons typically ripen in the late fall and early winter months, depending on the variety. American persimmons are usually ready in September or October.

How many persimmons does it take to get one cup of pulp?
The number of persimmons needed for 1 cup of pulp will vary depending on the size and variety of the fruit. Persimmons with seeds require about 50-60 persimmons to produce one cup of pulp.

What is the best way to extract persimmon pulp?
The easiest way with the fewest steps for extracting persimmon pulp would be to press the fruit through a metal strainer. This will result in an almost pure pulp with no chunks or pieces.

How to ripen persimmons?
Leave your persimmons at room temperature until they soften and turn a reddish-orange color.

How long can you store persimmon pulp in the fridge?
Without a preservative, I only suggest keeping your persimmon pulp puree in the fridge in an airtight container for up to seven days.

A spoonfull of persimmon puree made fresh with several jars of pulp in the background.

Key takeaways

Making persimmon pulp is actually a very straightforward process that requires minimal steps.

We make some sort of persimmon puree recipe nearly every week in the fall from our four persimmon trees, and we still can’t keep up with it!

They seem to be falling to the ground faster than we can pick them!

So, if you have persimmon trees in your yard or have access to persimmons, I hope that you give this persimmon pulp recipe a go!

Let me know what you think by leaving a review or comment below!

Homemade persimmon pulp in a small bowl and being stored in glass mason jars in the background.

How to Make Persimmon Pulp From Persimmons (with or without seeds)

Laura Ascher
Persimmon pulp is so easy to make and is the perfect addition to nearly any recipe calling for fruit puree!
5 from 7 votes
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Course Breakfast
Cuisine American
Servings 1 cup
Calories 1176 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 60 ripe persimmons

Instructions
 

  • Begin by removing the stems from the persimmons and discarding.
  • Rinse the persimmons in cool water and strain them through a colander to remove any dirt and debris.
  • Place a strainer or colander over a large bowl to collect the pulp as it is made.
  • Add 10-15 persimmons at a time and use a large spoon to smash the pulp through the screen.
  • Continue smashing the persimmons until you have extracted all of the pulp. Scoop out the peel and seeds from the strainer and continue with the rest of the fruit.
  • Once all of the persimmons have been processed, transfer the pulp to an airtight container for storage. 

Notes

This method is perfect for persimmons with seeds in them.
A mesh strainer works best and produces perfect persimmon pulp. A colander will work as well, however, there may be a few larger pieces of pulp that make it through.
If your persimmons do not have seeds, you can puree the persimmon pulp in a blender.

Nutrition

Serving: 1ozCalories: 1176kcalCarbohydrates: 312gProtein: 10gFat: 3gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gSodium: 17mgFiber: 60gSugar: 211g
Keyword persimmon pulp, persimmon pulp recipe, persimmon puree
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This website provides approximate nutrition information based on third party calculations and is only an estimate. Each recipe and nutritional value will vary depending on the brands, measuring methods and portion sizes per household. We recommend running the ingredients through whichever online nutritional calculator you prefer.

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